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Write of Spring - a New Writing Showcase

Published by: Carolin Kopplin on 10th Apr 2017 | View all blogs by Carolin Kopplin

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Network Theatre is a community theatre space in the underground railway arches of London Waterloo station. Run by the volunteers of the resident Network Theatre Company, an amateur theatre group, the venue offers productions of contemporary theatre and provide a rather unique location for visiting theatre companies and events.

The festival Write of Spring, which took place on just one day, 19th March, was a celebration of new writing, featuring six short plays that focus on beginnings - the start of a new life or a new discovery.

The first play One in Four, written and directed by Kate Pettigrew, takes place on a sheep farm. It is lambing time and Sally (Andrea Mentlikowski) is having a difficult birth. When the lambs are finally born, they are up to all kinds of nonsense, playing and rolling around in the stable, and they listen with big eyes as Sally tells them stories about green fields. Will they ever get to see them? Farmer Steve (Owain Jones) and his wife Jess (Kat Holland) have a rather fraught relationship ever since Jess had a miscarriage for which she blames herself. A delightful play with dark undertones.

Braincell by Shaun Smith, directed by Rebecca Mason, begins as the clock strikes twelve on New Year's Eve. Regret (Nigel Williams), Reluctance (Amy Andrews), Reminiscence (Edmée Sierts), and Recognition (Tekle Baroti) reflect on loss in this pinteresque play that consists mainly of monologues. Nigel Williams was particularly impressive as he expressed his grief about his recent loss.

The last play before the interval was Life Boat by Lisa Pancucci, directed by Kate Pettigrew. Middle-aged Martin (Nick Rutherford) visits Helda (Lisa Pancucci), his dominatrix, who is already annoyed by his delay: "Mistress Fury waits for no one." Delightful punishment awaits - but this time Martin would like to try a completely different direction. A bittersweet comedy with a surprise ending.

The Dark before Dawn by Amy Andrews deals with a couple that couldn't be more different. Ivy (Edmée Sierts) is the eternal optimist who loves to sing and enjoy life whereas Eben (Peter Kershaw), a pessimist, feels worn down by Ivy's seemingly carefree attitude: "Doesn't anything ever bother you?" A light-hearted play asking some serious questions about how one should live one's life.

Ryan M. Bultrowicz's play Shower Thoughts deals with writer's block. Robert (Nigel Williams) has taken umpteenth showers to restart his brain but he still cannot think of an ending to his book. His girlfriend Kate (Andrea Mentlikowski) prevents Robert from taking yet another shower with a different suggestion. The play is a bit too short for character development and Robert's change happens a bit out of the blue but the premise is interesting.

The evening concluded with Cuckoo by Shamini Bundell, directed by Kristen Farebrother. Miles (Owain Jones), a PhD student in archaelogy, is invited to an army base to investigate a mysterious object. The object is top secret and must not be moved. Miles is excited because he usually does not get the opportunity of shining with his expert knowledge as his professor is taking all the credit for his hard work. Will Miles dare to be bold this one time?

An entertaining evening with some promising work by new writers.

By Carolin Kopplin 

Network Theatre - London's Secret Community Theatre

246A LOWER ROAD, WATERLOO, LONDON, SE1 8SJ

More information on Network Theatre: https://networktheatre.org/

The next show will be Collaborators by John Hodge, from 21 June - 24 June 2017

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