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Rounds at the Blue Elephant Theatre

Published by: Carolin Kopplin on 20th Mar 2017 | View all blogs by Carolin Kopplin

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I'm supposed to be a doctor and all I've done today is hurt people and file paperwork.

Although junior doctors have not been in the news lately, their situation has remained unchanged whilst the NHS continues to be in crisis. Resuscitate Theatre have conducted interviews and collected anecdotes to tell the story of six junior doctors in a physical and theatrical way.

The performance begins with a news clip on the plight of junior doctors as one junior doctor has fallen asleep on her desk. As the others arrive, they are swiftly going through a variety of tasks - hurrying to cubicles, opening and closing curtains, writing reports. It is obvious that they are dealing with a workload that is hardly manageable.

Grace (Alex Hinson) learns that her mentor has resigned after the death of a patient which could have been prevented by timely treatment but the doctor simply could not find the time. Lucy (Penelope Rodie) has an introductory meeting with management and is thoroughly questioned about the gap in her CV. Meanwhile Tom (Adam Deane) deals with the workload by being careless but Tom knows how to work the system to stay on top of the game. Kal (Nicolas Pimpare), a brilliant doctor who keeps on studying throughout his spare time, sees his competency questioned by patients who demand to be treated by an English doctor. Dom (Iain Gibbons) tries to be hospitable but his colleagues are just too tired to care for dinner. Felicity (Christina Carty) keeps going on alcohol and cigarettes.

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The beginning of Anna Marshall's production feels a bit rushed as the cast use movement to reflect the hustle and bustle of a busy hospital, which is somewhat hard to follow. Yet after the fast-paced beginning, Rounds becomes more engaging and succeeds in making valid points on the stressful and frustrating situation junior doctors continue to find themselves in. The stress is taking its toll as relationships crumble, some doctors turn to alcohol and other stimulants, and others suffer from increasing anxiety attacks.

Apart from the huge number of patients, inequality and racism add to the stress. When the overwhelming workload leads to mistakes, two junior doctors face disciplinary consequences. The public school boy is let off with a slap on the wrist and is still transferred to the most popular ward whilst the female doctor is severely disciplined and consequently sent to a ward that is not even among the top 50 on her list. Another female doctor with a clean sheet is sent to the other end of the country. Although Kal is an excellent doctor, he is replaced with a "proper English doctor" when a racist patient demands it.

This highly relevant play reflects the situation of not only junior doctors but the health service in general as more and more tasks and responsibilities are shouldered by fewer and fewer doctors, nurses, and carers. The NHS is one sector that does not benefit from any more cuts.

By Carolin Kopplin

Until 25th March 2016

Blue Elephant Theatre

Running time: 60 minutes with no interval

Recommended for ages 12+

Post show discussion on Friday 24th March

Panel will include: Resuscitate Theatre, Doctors Support Network, Creative Dissent and Docs not Cops.

Images by Stephen Poole.

Comments

1 Comment

  • Cameron Lowe
    by Cameron Lowe 5 months ago
    You are so right, Carolin. Highly relevant indeed. Thanks for your review.
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