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Rodney Ackland's After October at the Finborough Theatre

Published by: Carolin Kopplin on 26th Nov 2016 | View all blogs by Carolin Kopplin


Marigold Ivens (Beverley Klein) encourages Clive Monkhams (Adam Buchanan)

The fabric of this house is built on the idea that I'm a genius.

It is surprising that Rodney Ackland's most autobiographical play has not been shown in Central London since its premiere in 1936. But thanks to Troupe and the Finborough Theatre, Ackland's forgotten drama can currently be seen at the Chelsea venue, which has been transformed in a big living room with the audience seated on all sides, making this experience even more intimate than usual.

Taking place in a run-down flat in Hampstead, the drama focusses on aspiring playwright Clive Monkhams (Adam Buchanan) who is dreaming of fame and fortune. As the performance begins, Clive is working on an overdue article whilst his mother, retired actor Rhoda (Sasha Waddell), reminisces about past glory. The widowed Rhoda, who is slowly running out of ideas of how to avoid her numerous creditors, completely relies on her son's future success - as do his penniless sisters and a number of artistic friends. When Clive learns that his play will be shown in the West End, the future suddenly looks all too bright. Everybody, except rebel-poet Oliver Nashwick (Patrick Osborne), expects the play to be a success and plans are being made. 


Rhoda Monkhams (Sasha Waddell)

Clive promises to marry his secret love Frances (Jasmine Blackborow), who has been going out with dull civil servant Brian Guest (Stephen Rashbrook) to combat her loneliness. Rhoda is hoping to move into a bigger flat with Mrs Batley (Josie Kidd) as a live-in servant, thereby rescuing her from her vicious son-in-law. Clive's bohemian friend Marigold Ivens (Beverley Klein) hopes that Clive can get her nephew Bobby, currently residing at Wandsworth Prison, a job once the play will be touring. Oliver expects a £100 loan to publish his brilliant poems in case he is wrong and the "boring" play will be a success.

As opening night is drawing nearer, Clive's sister Joan (Allegra Marland) has quit her job as a secretary for her overbearing lover Alec Mant (Jonathan Oliver), married with children, and is concentrating on her art work. Sister Lou (Peta Cornish), a dancer, has returned from France with her French husband Armand (Andrew Cazanave Pin), adding to Rhoda's financial burden. Money is running out fast.


Frances Dent (Jasmine Blackborow), Joan Monkhams (Allegra Marland), Alec Mant (Jonathan Oliver) and Lou St. René (Peta Cornish) 

Oscar Toeman's production might be a bit longish but there is not one dull moment. Rodney Ackland's satirical play about a bohemian family, with touches of Coward and Rattigan, is delightful and all of his characters, no matter how small the part, are well written. The talented cast make the most of it. Apart from the impressive leads - Adam Buchanan and Sasha Waddell -, Beverley Klein is hilarious as the eccentric Marigold Ivens, believer in numerology and amateur actor. Peta Cornish is terribly stylish as Clive's sister Lou and Josie Kidd inhabits her role as Mrs Batley.

An atmospheric set design by Ann Vize, Anna Lewis' authentic costumes and music by Lucinda Mason Brown add to the appeal of the play.

A forgotten classic that should not be missed.

By Carolin Kopplin

Until 22nd December 2016 at the Finborough Theatre

118 Finborough Road, London SW10 9ED Box Office 0844 847 1652

Book online at

Running time: 2 hours 40 minutes including one interval

Photographs by Mitzi de Margary



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