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Not Dead Enough at the Richmond Theatre

Published by: Carolin Kopplin on 15th Mar 2017 | View all blogs by Carolin Kopplin

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 You hurt someone by killing what he loves.

Following the success of The Perfect Murder and Dead Simple, another adaptation of a Peter James crime novel is being brought to the stage. Detective Superintendent Roy Grace, played by Shane Richie, returns to investigate a mysterious murder case and Laura Whitmore, of Strictly Come Dancing fame, is his love interest Cleo Morey. 

Peter James is one of the most popular crime fiction writers, his novels have sold over 17 million copies worldwide, and he is the 2016 recipient of the Diamond Dagger, the most highly esteemed award for crime writers. The third novel of his Roy Grace series sees the troubled detective hunt a serial killer.

Popular philanthropist Katie Bishop is found strangled, wearing a gas mask. Detective Superintendent Roy Grace suspects the victim's husband - Brian Bishop - although Bishop claims to have been sixty miles away from his home in Brighton when the murder was committed. Bishop appears to be devastated by his wife's death but Roy Grace does not trust Bishop's overwrought emoting. Apart from being overcome with grief he is jumpy and nervous. Grace's suspicions seem to be confirmed when it turns out that Bishop cheated on his wife.

Meanwhile Cleo Morey (Laura Whitmore), Roy Grace's attractive girlfriend in forensics, is expecting a bit more commitment from the hesitant detective, who is still struggling with the disappearance of his wife Sandy ten years ago. Her colleague Sophie Harington (Gemma Atkins) seems more fortunate with her dashing paramour. 

Not-Dead-Enough.-Photo-by-Mark-Douet-_31B9393-1024x683.jpgRoy Grace (Shane Richie) and Glenn Branson (Michael Quartey) are grilling Brian Bishop (Stephen Billington) 

Directed by Ian Talbot, there is some rather dark humour in this suspenseful production which offers one or two surprises that will make you jump. Yet the first half of Shaun McKenna's adaptation is a big sluggish. There is too much small talk slowing down the action whilst the characters pace between the forensics lab upstage and the police office downstage, both held in a drab grey. Yet the action picks up considerably in the second half when Roy Grace finds himself hunting a serial killer who is also responsible for a number of unsolved crimes.

Shane Richie convinces as the investigator who is tormented by the disappearance of his wife and Stephen Billington manages the right balance of charm and menace as the suspect. Michael Quartey delivers some of the best jokes as Grace's colleague and friend Glenn Branson. However, the female characters are rather clich├ęd and mainly serve as romantic props, except for Bella Moy, played by Gemma Stroyan with cool efficiency. Laura Whitmore and Gemma Atkins are doing their best with characters so overcome by emotion that they are unable to think straight and therefore put themselves - and others - in harm's way. 

Still there is much to enjoy in this solid thriller which offers more than one twist. 

By Carolin Kopplin

Until 18th March 2017 at the Richmond Theatre, then continuing its UK tour.

Tickets: http://uktheatrenet.ambassadortickets.com/whatson.aspx

Photograph by Mark Douet.

Comments

1 Comment

  • Cameron Lowe
    by Cameron Lowe 1 year ago
    Thanks, Carolin. Good to hear your views on this one.
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