Share |

Mad Meg at the Blue Elephant Theatre

Published by: Carolin Kopplin on 21st Nov 2016 | View all blogs by Carolin Kopplin

Mad meg new_0.jpgMarianne Tuckman and Phoebe Ophelia Douthwaite

Meg spent much time with thinking. Her favourite topic: How the world connects.

The final production of the Elefeet Dance Festival 2016 at the Blue Elephant Theatre was a fusion of dance, folk music, and storytelling, skilfully presented by MAZPOD. Starting off in a rather unconventional way, Laurence Marshall, a multi-instrumentalists, sang a couple of folk songs, accompanying himself with a variety of instruments, whilst the audience were waiting in the upstairs bar for the actual show to begin. The cheerful and comical gig included songs about pirates and how hard it is to be a breakfast cereal.

The actual dance performance kicked off with Phoebe Ophelia Douthwaite and Marianne Tuckman sitting at a table with Laurence Marshall, having a couple of beers. As they began to tell the story of Mad Meg, Marshall accompanied them on the accordion, a ukulele and percussive instruments, whilst the two dancers/actors took turns playing Meg and the people she associated with. The extremely physical performance narrated the story of a lonely woman, socially isolated because of her odd behaviour - "she shrieked her questions so loud and so coarse" - and her plain looks. Nobody wanted to talk to her and listen to her, she was silenced by everybody. But one day she met a man who was willing to marry her.

Meg's story, her awkwardness and loneliness were transported by movement as well as words. Her shrinking from others, the rejection she experienced, yet also her unpleasant groping and her involuntarily aggressive behaviour became apparent in the performance. The scene when Meg's husband showed his true feelings for her was devastating.

Inspired by Texas Gladden's ballad "The Scolding Wife" and Clarissa Pinkolas book "Women Who Run With Wolves", this production discussed relationships, abusive behaviour and domestic violence, and the soul destroying effect of loneliness.

An intense and intriguing production.

By Carolin Kopplin 

The short run has now ended. 

Running time: Approximately one hour

Photograph provided by the Blue Elephant Theatre.

Comments

0 Comments

     
Please login or sign up to post on this network.
Click here to sign up now.