Share |

Late Company at the Finborough Theatre

Published by: Carolin Kopplin on 30th Apr 2017 | View all blogs by Carolin Kopplin

Todd Boyce, Lucy Robinson, Lisa Stevenson, David Leopold, Alex Lowe

You don't want an apology. You want blood.

Written by 28-year old Canadian Jordan Tannahill, this play deals with the suicide of a gay teenager who was bullied by other high school students in small-town Canada where homosexuality is still something that should be kept a secret. 

Debora (Lucy Robinson) and Michael Shaun-Hastings (Todd Boyce) are expecting guests for dinner. The table is beautifully set, with a bowl of flowers as its centrepiece, but Debora is not satisfied. Pacing around the table, she eventually disposes of the napkin rings because they might be too formal for the occasion. One year after the suicide of their 16-year old son Joel, the Shaun-Hastings have decided to meet with the high school bully, who was responsible for Joel's death, and his parents to find closure. Michael, a conservative politician, is not enthusiastic about this meeting but Debora, an artist who works in metal, tries to clear the negativity: "We're receiving and bestowing, Michael." But their guests are already forty minutes late.

When they finally arrive, Bill Dermot (Alex Lowe) explains that they are late due to an argument with his wife Tamara (Lisa Stevenson) - he shares Michael's skepticism regarding this meeting and did not want to go. Tamara, however, is eager to come together to achieve harmony and "put things behind them". She has been exchanging e-mails with Debora for some time and feels there can be reconciliation with Debora. Unfortunately, Tamara forgot to mention that her son Curtis (David Leopold) is allergic to shellfish so Curtis has to do with a sandwich and a few grapes whilst the rest of the dinner guests are having shellfish pasta.

Although Debora and Michael are trying to remain civil, the atmosphere is fraught with tension. Tamara soon switches from water to wine.

Curtis (David Leopold) reading his apology to Debora (Lucy Robinson)

Zahra Mansouri's beautiful set extends into the auditorium, placing the audience inside the dining room with the cast. As soon as the Dermots arrive, there is palpable tension. Debora seems calm and composed but there is bitterness and fury under her thin layer of civility. Tamara is longing for forgiveness and reconciliation. Michael, always the politician, is trying for the middle path whereas Bill proves to be even more of a bully than his son Curtis, who remains rather quiet during much of the evening, but is actually the most intriguing character.

Michael Yale's sensitive production about grief, forgiveness and reconciliation is almost painful to watch as two families are trying to find closure after a terrible tragedy. The play, which features an outstanding cast, shows that bigotry and intolerance also run in the family and dissects the relationship between sons and constantly absent fathers.

A gripping production that should not be missed.

By Carolin Kopplin 

Until 20th May 2016

Finborough Theatre

Box office: 0844 8471652

Running time: 70 minutes without an interval

Photo credit: Charlie Round-Turner



Please login or sign up to post on this network.
Click here to sign up now.