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Imogen at Shakespeare's Globe

Published by: Clare Brotherwood on 25th Sep 2016 | View all blogs by Clare Brotherwood

EastEnders family The Carters have been out in force at Shakespeare’s Globe.

Actors Danny Dyer and Kellie Bright, who play publicans Mick and Linda Carter in the BBC soap, were there to support Maddy Hill, who played their on-screen daughter Nancy.

Maddy’s credits, apart from EastEnders, only amount to a handful of parts, but two of them are Shakespearian, and now there’s a third - Imogen, the title role in a ‘renamed and reclaimed’ production of Cymbeline.

Part of the Globe’s artistic director Emma Rice’s first season, Imogen couldn’t be better for attracting new, young audiences to Shakespeare.

Gang warfare, it seems, is nothing new, and director Matthew Dunster has brought this play literally kicking and screaming into the 21st century. Imogen is bang up to date with a cast clad in tracksuits, trainers and baseball caps, rapping and street dancing its way through a bloody tale of murder, revenge - and, of course, love.

Designer Jon Bausor’s set is stark and dark, the only dressings, butchers’ curtains! And there’s plenty of butchery, I can tell you! Oh, and occasional drugs and can of lager.

Fights between Imogen’s black-clad Britons and the Romans, dressed in white, who are harbouring Imogen’s banished husband Posthumus, are both balletic and realistic, with the added attraction of sometimes taking place in midair! The energetic young actors take everything in their stride. To the pounding beats of sound designer George Dennis’s atmospheric music, their performances are invigorating, and aggressive, especially Ira Mandela Siobhan’s powerful Posthumus, with added gravitas from Jonathan McGuinness as Cymbeline, king of the Britons, and Martin Marquez as Belarius, who for the last 20 years has been bringing up the king’s sons as his own.

I don’t know whether it’s politically correct to single out William Grint, one of those sons, but he and the rest of the cast should be applauded for making William’s deafness part of the action and giving this play extra depth and some humanity. I doubt many briefs include sign language!

The play is, however, Imogen’s story - of how she marries against the wishes of her father, the king, who punishes her by banishing her husband. How her husband believes her to be unfaithful and sends someone to kill her while she, dressed as a youth, searches the land to be at his side, on the way being poisoned and waking up beside an headless corpse. Always fiesty but with a soft side, as Imogen Maddy Hill shines, appearing streetwise and yet with that vulnerability which made her so popular in EastEnders. She’d certainly give The Mitchells a run for their money!

The story may be a familiar one in today’s world where drugs and street crime are sadly all too common, but there are lighter moments: Joshua Lacey causes a laugh every time he struts onto the stage as Cymbeline’s loutish, football shirt-wearing stepson, and the appearance of an illuminated greenhouse apparently growing marijuana, also causes amusement.

 

Imogen is at Shakespeare’s Globe until October 16

www.shakespearesglobe.com/imogen

Comments

2 Comments

  • Cameron Lowe
    by Cameron Lowe 1 year ago
    Thanks, Clare. This sounds like a multi-faceted production with much to applaud.
  • Elaine Pinkus
    by Elaine Pinkus 1 year ago
    Interestingly Emma Rice has now left in (er um) somewhat cloudy circumstances. Maybe the purists did not like her take on Shakespeare? I have been quite impressed by the new perspectives but there you are!
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