Share |

Dr Angelus at the Finborough Theatre

Published by: Carolin Kopplin on 30th Nov 2016 | View all blogs by Carolin Kopplin

15272235_10153920984311372_6342575706037104149_o.jpgJanet McAdam (Rosalind McAndrew) and Dr Angelus (David Rintoul)

You did your best but it wasn't very good.

Glaswegian James Bridie worked as a doctor before he became a full-time writer in 1938. The main founder of the Citizens Theatre in Glasgow, Bridie was also instrumental in the establishment of the Edinburgh Festival. In the late 1940s, he collaborated with Alfred Hitchcock on several films, including The Paradine Case (1947). Although one of the most successful and best known playwrights of the 1930s and 1940s, Bridie's work has not been seen outside Scotland for many years. This production by the Finborough Theatre marks the first production of Dr Angelus in England since its 1947 London premiere, starring Alastair Sim and George Cole.

Glasgow, 1920. Doctor Angelus has taken on a junior partner, earnest young doctor George Johnson. When Dr Angelus’ treatment of his own mother-in-law, who suffers from a gastric complaint,  results in her death, George remains fiercely loyal, although he is warned against his eccentric senior partner. However, when Mrs Angelus suddenly begins to suffer from the same gastric complaint as her mother, Dr Johnson's suspicions are aroused.

15259208_10153920983991372_7863128611295733755_o.jpg

Dr George Johnson (Alex Bhat) and Inspector MacIvor (Malcolm Rennie)

Dr Angelus is a classic psychological thriller, based on the true life case of Dr Edward Pritchard, the last person to be hanged in Glasgow. Drawing on James Bridie's medical experience, the play focuses on what it means to be a doctor, repeatedly referring to the Hippocratic Oath which is, of course, in stark contrast to what Dr Angelus is up to.

Jenny Ogilvie's exciting production mostly serves the form of a classic thriller yet departs from it in a surreal dream sequence presenting the inner conflict of the young doctor, who finds himself torn between loyalty to his mentor and his duty to save lives. Despite its sombre subject, the play is darkly funny with more than a touch of gallows humour.

The production features a tour-de-force performance by David Rintoul. Rintoul inhabits the role of Dr Cyril Angelus, a charismatic and cunning manipulator with delusions of grandeur who takes advantage of Dr Johnson's naivitĂ© to execute his evil plan. Using an innocent yet slightly ambiguous episode with seductive patient Irene Corcoran (Lesley Harcourt), Rintoul evades Johnson's questions, indirectly accusing Johnson of unprofessional behaviour with a patient and warning him that this might cost him his license. Alex Bhat is very good as the young, inexperienced doctor who wants to do the right thing but finds himself incapable to do so.

However, the female roles are rather two-dimensional. Rosalind McAndrew does make an impact as the insolent servant Janet McAdam who openly shows her disdain for Mrs Angelus (Vivien Heilbron), the obedient and rather passive wife of a patriarch. Malcolm Rennie provides comic relief as the pompous Sir Gregory Butt, a senior doctor who is consulted by Dr Angelus when it is already too late, and the quirky yet good-natured Inspector MacIvor.

There were problems with the lighting and rather obtrusive sound effects but I assume that these were early run issues that will be taken care of before long.

By Carolin Kopplin 

Until 20th December 2016 at the Finborough Theatre

118 Finborough Road, London SW10 9ED
Box Office 0844 847 1652
Book online at www.finboroughtheatre.co.uk

Running time: 2 hours 15 minutes including one interval.

Photographs by Lidia Crisafulli

Comments

0 Comments

     
Please login or sign up to post on this network.
Click here to sign up now.