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Awful Auntie at Milton Keynes Theatre

Published by: Louise Winter on 10th Nov 2017 | View all blogs by Louise Winter

Reviewed by Louise Winter 8th November 2017

poster AA

My nephew has read all David Walliams’ books and greatly enjoyed Gangsta Granny when it was at MK theatre last year so he’s here with me again reviewing this latest offering from the massively Walliams. Neil Foster, of Horrible Histories fame, has adapted Awful Auntie into this stage production with somewhat less success (at least with this audience) than was achieved with Gangsta. Perhaps this is because there is nothing original in this tale. Gangsta was a great modern adventure story full of humour and emotion. Awful Auntie has less of both.  

Twelve year-old Lady Stella Saxby (Georgina Leonidas) wakes up from a coma to find her parents have died and she is confined to Saxby Hall at the mercy of the Awful Aunt Alberta (Timothy Speyer). Stella suspects her Aunt has killed her parents and tries to escape with the help of the house ghost, Soot. An adventure of sorts unfolds but there is more talking than action; the on stage car chase couldn’t be slower and more could be made of Auntie on a motorbike which was visually very amusing but short lived.

Jacqueline Trousdale’s set is great with turning, sliding turrets and her garb for Auntie is fittingly garish and awful. The actors do a good job; Timothy Speyer is super as Alberta, Richard James (Gibbon) has far and away the funniest moments and makes the most of them. Ashley Cousins (Soot) and Georgina Leonidas (Stella) make the most of rather one dimensional characters though Leonidas is miscast as a twelve year old.

There’s not enough mayhem, silliness or laughs. Williams’ has stated that he hopes the stage show will be a hoot but we thought it was lacking in the hoot department. He also states that Stella is a ‘pretty self-reliant heroine, and so I hope children will be inspired to find the strength within themselves to deal with bad situations’. Well, his story is rather old-fashioned and the moral – that it’s not important whether you are ‘posh’ or not - appears rather dated within the context of this partiuclar story. Walliams doesn’t purport to write great literature but entertaining, fun, absorbing books for children with some sort of moral attached. IIt seems that this story maybe is the most suitable to bring to the stage.

At Milton Keynes Theatre until Sunday 12th November 2017

Book tickets at http://www.atgtickets.com

Box office 0844 871 7652

Groups Hotline 01908 547609

Access Booking 0844 872 767

 

 

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